Subject

13

Date & time

Fri, 13 Dec 2019
10:45 - 15:45

Venue

Emmanuel Centre, London
9 - 23 Marsham Street
London, SW1P 3DW

Ticket price

£23 + VAT* *Plus one complimentary staff ticket per ten students

About this day

For A level and IB students

Five sessions of phenomenal physics will be brought to you by the brightest lights in the field in  2019. Join us for a day full of inspiration, challenge and experimentation across the breadth of physics. A special session on examination success will provide students with the tools to excel. We look forward to welcoming you to Physics in Action this year!

Programme & speakers

The SI redefined Michael de Podesta, National Physical Laboratory

2019 sees changes to the definitions of the kilogram, ampere, kelvin and mole, four of the seven ‘SI’ units. Michael explains these changes and why, even though you probably didn’t even notice anything, you should be happy about them.

Michael de Podesta

About Michael de Podesta

Michael’s research interests concern all aspects of temperature measurement. Michael is a chartered physicist, a member of the Institute of Physics, and received an MBE for Services to Science

Strange ice Andrea Sella, UCL

Andrea Sella

About Andrea Sella

Andrea is a synthetic chemist and broadcaster who is interested in the structure and bonding in the rare earths. He has been involved in numerous radio and television projects.

The physics of smart buildings Ozak Esu, Centre for Smart Homes and Buildings

Building physics employs creative ways to manipulate a building’s indoor and outdoor environment to influence its performance. Ozak introduces the basics of building physics and the application of smart electronics and technology to improve operational efficiencies.

Ozak Esu

About Ozak Esu

Ozak is the Technical Lead in Smart Buildings at The Centre for Smart Homes and Buildings. She arrived the UK from Nigeria at 17 to study for a degree and PhD in electronic and electrical engineering at Loughborough University.

Electrifying the voice Trevor Cox, University of Salford

How does the voice work and how has it been changed by technology? Drawing on examples from opera to hip-hop, Trevor shows how physics, psychology and neuroscience can help explain diverse singing styles.

Trevor Cox

About Trevor Cox

Trevor Cox is Professor of Acoustic Engineering at Salford University where he teaches and researches room acoustics and audio.