9

Date & time

Thu, 9 Nov 2017
11:00 - 16:00

Venue

Imperial College London
Sherfield Building, South Kensington Campus
London, SW7 2AZ

Book a place

£23 + VAT* *Plus one complimentary staff ticket per ten students

About this day

This inspirational day of KS5 computer science will take your students to the cutting edge in fields from computer vision, software development and algorithms to pure programming and computer systems. Five renowned speakers from universities, industries and the media will reveal computer science at its very best and your students will have a whole lot of fun along the way. This day also features a special session with hints and tips for examination success.

Programme & speakers

The magic of computer science Peter McOwan, Queen Mary, University of London

From magic tricks to being able to do the (almost) impossible, computer science and mathematics underpin the modern world. Join Peter to discover how to create magic tricks with maths, and use computer vision to better understand what humans see.

Peter McOwan

About Peter McOwan

Peter is a Professor of Computer Science in the School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science at Queen Mary, University of London.  His research interests are in visual perception, mathematical models for visual processing, cognitive science and biologically inspired hardware and software and science outreach.

Drinking from the fire hose – data science Miranda Mowbray, Research Scientist

The data scientists who find useful patterns in large data sets have been described as the new rock stars of the technology world. One particularly promising application area for data science is computer network security. Miranda will talk about some general issues with analysing big data to discover security problems in large computer networks, and some techniques that have been successful.

Miranda Mowbray

About Miranda Mowbray

Miranda Mowbray formerly worked as a research scientist for Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, finding new ways of analyzing data to detect attacks on computer networks. Her PhD is in Algebra, from London University. She is a Fellow of the British Computer Society.

Computer Systems Matthew Leeke, University of Warwick

Matt will delve into the dos and don’ts of systems software. By delving into some fascinating applications Matt will explain why things like operating systems, utility programs, libraries and translators are designed the way they are.

Matthew Leeke

About Matthew Leeke

Matt is Associate Professor at the University of Warwick where he is also the director of undergraduate studies. His research addresses a variety of issues relating to the design, implementation and evaluation of dependable systems.

Examiner's session Paul Long, ICT Trainer and Author

This is a special session on examination success designed to provide students with the tools to excel.

Paul Long

About Paul Long

Paul Long spent many years as the Principal Moderator and Principal Examiner for OCR’s AS Level. He has written text books and led training for teachers across the UK and internationally.

How to program a cell Jasmin Fisher, Microsoft Research

Jasmin will talk about the incredible algorithms she designed that are tailored for modelling and analysing biological networks and show how these algorithms could lead to programmable human cells.

Jasmin Fisher

About Jasmin Fisher

Jasmin Fisher is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research Cambridge in the Programming Principles & Tools group

Crowdology: how computer science keeps you safe Martyn Amos, Manchester Metropolitan University

Crowd science uses computing, psychology and design to study people en masse. Martyn will show how this new science keeps us safe, as well as highlighting some surprising facts about how we behave in crowds.

Martyn Amos

About Martyn Amos

Martyn Amos is Professor of Novel Computation at Manchester Metropolitan University, where he is Director of the Informatics Research Centre. His research focusses on the development of new ways of computing, based on natural processes, and the study of complex systems using computational techniques.